How to Make Helium Balloons Last Longer

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For any party, birthdays, or celebrations, balloons are a must! Balloons are a popular option for decorating a fun party. The only problem is, they don’t last very long. They deflate just hours after they’re tied. But, with these tips, you can make your helium balloons last longer!

To make balloons last longer, keep them away from heat or sunlight. If you need the helium latex balloons to last longer than several hours, HI-Float is a non-toxic coating used inside a balloon to keep it floating.

Why do latex helium balloons deflate?

As the latex expands, helium atoms are able to pass through the pores of the balloon (some even escapes through the knot at the bottom). Over time, this results in the balloon deflating.

This is why foil or mylar helium balloons last a lot longer; the pores are a lot smaller than latex.

Temperature has a high impact on how long helium balloons last. High temperature causes the helium atoms inside to bounce around faster, causing a faster leakage. This is why if you leave balloons in a car on a hot, sunny day, they will not last very long.

How to keep the helium balloon from deflating in the cold?

If it’s a latex balloon, it will always deflate eventually due to the latex porous structure. However, compared to keeping the balloon in the heat, it will last longer. If you need the balloon to last longer than a few hours, a coating of Hi-Float on the inside will help.

Depending on how cold it is, the balloon will start drooping the colder it is. The lower temperature causes the helium atoms to move slower, putting less outward pressure on the walls of the balloon.

How to keep the helium balloon from deflating overnight?

A coating of Hi-Float is necessary to keep helium balloons floating overnight or for 12+ hours.

How long do helium balloons last?

It depends on several factors: temperature, shape, and material to name a few. A standard latex balloon under 12” can last up to 12 hours.

Foil or mylar balloons can float for a few days and sometimes weeks depending on the material and how well it is sealed.

Where to get helium balloons filled up?

If you buy the balloons in-store at CVS, they will fill it with helium for you. Make sure they attach the string to the balloon before they blow it! You don’t want the balloon flying everywhere. Most dollar stores and Party City will also fill up your balloons with helium (though locations may vary).

How to get confetti to stick to inside of balloon?

If you have ever put confetti inside of a balloon, you will notice it all clumps towards the bottom. Unless you have glitter that is less dense than helium, it won’t float inside. The confetti can stick to the sides of a balloon with a light coating of Hi-Float. If this coating isn’t present, then there’s nothing to hold the confetti in place when the balloon inflates and helium fills it up.

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